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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 136 (some duplicates have been removed)
, others that want to live in a city, live in a urban environment. don't want to get on a google bus and drive down 101 every day. google and others want to serve the population of their employees. it's food to have opportunities in both places. so this urban, i call them urban hipsters essentially want to stay in san francisco. they're opening offices here. >> does san francisco have a particular niche in the industry or not really? >> you know, it's not the device-heavy kind of cisco, the big data kind of things. it's more in the consumer space, mostly consumer, cloud is here, there's all kinds of companies like that that are here and are in the software or the app space. >> one of the other things that happened this week is texas governor rick perry was making a lot of news saying california's high taxes and tough environmental laws are going to make companies and rich people in the bay area want to move to texas. he's coming here to make this pitch. what are the chances of people en masse leaving silicon valley to go to texas? >> not so much. he makes a lot of noise all the time,
of antigovernment protesters have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things. >> right nouts not the rig
with other urban areas so we can reenvironment allize this country from the cities out. >> "the wall street journal" recently said young nerds with laptops. >> my favorite, my boyfriend. i'm a cougar to the young nerds with laptops. >> rose: are moving to new orleanses from new york and san francisco. >> yeah. >> rose: so these are smart people looking to have a good life, who know that in today's world where you can be anywhere, where distance and time are no longer as big a factor as it used to be you can do it all. >> let me give you an example what this means. music is huge, clint davis, he puts on gas ferx the super bowl. i said clint, what is the status of music right now. he said we're in a golden era. we have street bands everywhere. there are 150 different bands that are playing this weekend in new orleans. and so but what is happened is if you think of a street band, the way this guys exist is by tips. and whether what do we carry that young people don't carry, cash, money. >> okay. and so they've developed an app, these silicon via guys that you can tip with your cell phone. so t
of a recent murder to protest gun violence in their city. >> stop the violence! stop the violence! do something! >> they call themselves s.a.v.e., an acronym for soldiers against violence everywhere. >> we are soldiers. we're out here in the rain, cold, doing what we do. >> s.a.v.e. was started in 2010 by the pastor at oakland's true vine ministries church after a member of his congregation was shot and killed. >> we sort of took a page from the civil right's movement where they would go to the lunch counters and sit in until they were arrested. so we do stand-ins. we go to the community where someone has been murdered and we go and protest in the community about the violence. >> we are here to support you, let you know that your grandson will never be forgotten. >> i'm here today to support my grandson, aaron, that was killed last month. actually on november 24th. so i'm here to support him to let everyone know that he did have a family. these are our babies. please put these guns away. >> julia ford's grandson was one of oakland's 131 homicide victims in 2012. the murder rates have
at exorbitant rates -- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousness by getting this bill passed in the coming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the system, you elect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transforma
, and schools closed in a number of cities. forecasters predicted new england would get the worst of it with up to three feet of snow likely in boston. mayor thomas menino. >> this is a storm of major proportions. stay off the roads. stay home. let the public works crews do their job. >> brown: the region also braced for winds reaching 75 miles an hour that will pile up drifts and almost guarantee widespread power outages. as ever, the threat prompted shoppers to pack stores, stocking up on supplies. >> this is panic shopping, so bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> you've got to plan ahead. a couple feet of snow would shut everything down and, who knows, it could be a couple of days, right? >> brown: in new york city, predictions called for as much as a foot of snow, and mayor michael bloomberg said the city had marshaled an army of plows and salt trucks. >> the sanitation department will deploy something like 1,700 snowplows and 65 front-end loaders. it also has 450 salt-spreaders already deployed. >> brown: the storm also focused new concern on the new york and new j
've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building where about 250 people worked. the cause of the blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping down. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt and
fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this giant streak across the sky that was
to a meter of snow from new york city to boston and beyond. the parents of a teenage girl shot dead days after appearing at president obama's inauguration have told the bbc that american gun laws have to change. 15-year-old hadiya pendleton was killed in a park on chicago's south side in what police believe was a case of mistaken identity. michelle obama will attend her funeral tomorrow. despite the soul-searching in america following the sandy hook shooting, january was the deadliest month for gun crime in chicago for a decade. we have this report from the city. >> majorette from a chicago high school on a visit to washington for the president's inauguration. in the middle, 15-rolled hadiya pendleton, who had appeared in a video denouncing gun violence. >> this video is informational for you and your future children. >> it was a gun in her life in this chicago part 10 days ago as she sheltered from the rain. the killer apparently mistook her for a rival gang member. >> never in a million years did i think that i would lose my child to a gunshot. she was not that type of kid. >> do you t
city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the electrification story from the beginning of the 20th century. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in their home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling elec
the line from delhi, the city where the man has his power base. it has been six years since he was charged with raping a local woman. the ministry is meeting constituents when we arrive. it they are asking for his help. he says the rape charge has been invented by his political rivals. >> this is a conspiracy. the charge was slapped on me during the last government. this is why i won the election by 30,000 votes. >> a lot of people find it hard to understand how ministers such as yourself up whole lot if they are facing serious charges themselves. >> just charging someone is not enough. >> but in many other countrywide, in many other democracies began many other countries -- in many other countries, many of the democracies -- >> this is an attempt to murder. attempt to murder. >> trying to change things can be dangerous, this man claims. when he tried to run against him, he tried to kill him, he claims. but nothing has happened. visiting him at his home, there were celebrations at his home. he was just promoted to transportation minister. denying he was even charged with attempted murder.
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
in the city. they're concerned about keeping their workers, picking their crops so they can make a decent profit, what they think is a decent profit. if they don't and i say, there's legalization, they're going to have to pay higher wages and that's going to mean an impact on consumers at the grocery stores. one thing the growers wanted to hear and haven't heard it heretofore, that's an idea of a guest worker program. many people on the conservative front are trying to push this, saying that this is going to stem illegal immigration in the future because you'll have a way that people can come back and forth and the growers can have people picking their crops and everyone's going to be happy. except big labor, a frks lrfl-c community groups are against a program because they find it unseemly and less inhiumane. what if someone comes in and wants citizenship? with the bacero program, if it comes out in the ensuing weeks, you do have something that addresses future immigration and that's something that proponents for a bacera program says is good. that you have something that will address il
to do something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, americans of every background stand up and say, "this time it's got to be different." >> ifill: the obama administration has been working to build on public outrage sparked by the mass shooting in newtown connecticut that left 20 children and six adults dead. ♪ for purple mountain majesty ♪ above... >> ifill: echos of that crime were still in the air last night at the super bowl where the sandy hook elementary school chorus sang "america the beautiful" before kick-off. and a super bowl ad paid for by mayors against illegal guns, a gun-control group, financed by new york mayor michael bloomberg
violence is till going on. on capitol hill in state houses in city halls and in gritty political campaigns the discussion about gun violence is going strong. >> they say it isn't about guns. they're wrong! it is about guns. [applause] let me say at the outset to all the press -- no law abiding citizen in the united states of america has any fear that their constitutional rights will be infringed in any way. none, zero. >> i don't think washington politicians trying to score political points should be taking away a fundamental individual right, a right the supreme court has said every law abiding american is guaranteed by the bill of rights. gwen: as part of our pbs initiative, after newtown, we turn now to an assessment to where the debate stands. molly, is the policy debate different this time? >> it feels very different. as we just saw, we had the vice president just this week speaking in connecticut making sure to use that white house bully bull pit to keep this -- bully pulpit to keep this discussion going. you had the president's former campaign apparatus now known as organizing for a
: in new york city and elsewhere, preparations are being made for clean-up. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on hand. >> reporter: according to the long island power authority, the storm has the potential to cause power outages for 100,000 customers on long island. and for the first time ever, lipa is deferring storm operations and response to its subcontractor, national grid. but in manhattan today, it was mostly business as usual, although many workers did try to leave early to beat the snow. and if the snowfall is anywhere close to the storm of '78, you'll see the impact in economic data in the weeks ahead. >> usually major storms cause increased volatility in economic data. so, that jobless claims jump significantly in the beginning as government offices close, because of the storm. and they surge back up after the offices reopened. >> reporter: if there's a silver lining in this storm, it's the timing. the heaviest snowfall will happen over the weekend. and the clean-up is expected well before valentines day, which contributes $18 billion to the economy. erika miller,
of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, a lot more than expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify, given today's higher down payment requirements.
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore who died at age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication to her he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it.
to discuss how the city is dealing with the manhunt, as well as some of the questions raised by this case. mayor, welcome back to the newshour. let's start with the state of the search. is there any progress to report? who is helping you and where are you concentrating? >> i can't tell you that there are any... that there's any progress to report. i can't tell you that we're following many, many leads, over a thousand leads now. we're looking for him. we've got our best detectives and investigators on this. we're working with the city of irvine and the city of... and county of riverside, the county of san bernadino, the marshals service, the f.b.i., we're all working and collaborating to find christopher dorn eras soon as possible. >> suarez: you mentioned the large number of leads. have some of those come in response to your recently offered million dollar reward? >> yes. some have come in response to that. but we're following every single lead. we take this matter very, very seriously. remember there are three people dead, killed in cold blood by christopher dorner, a man who is obvious
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate over school reform. she has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, i cut a central office bureaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's doing all these co
september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still presents with two people who have studied the epidemi
, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy and it fell at the wrong time. you know it started in the morning around rush hour and just continued until about 2:00 p.m. >> sreenivasan: the mayor said kansas city's main streets had been cleared by midday, and crews worked on residential neighborhoods. but yesterday, it was a far different story: this kansas city bus couldn't navigate the drifting snow and fishtailed into a lamp post. the snow came with high winds that piled up large drifts. and that, in turn, caused problems on the interstates. >> man, it's kind of tough out here even if you got a four wheel drive i advise you to stay in because everybody's getting stuck all over the place. it's a mess out here. >> sreenivasan: crews worked through the night and into today in missouri and kansas to plough i-70. 200 miles of the highway in kansas had been shut down as the storm blew through. today as the system tracked north and east, it created
. the syrian city of homs has seen some of the worst fighting of this civil war. as many as 20,000 people have died in the streets, but people do still live there, trying to create whatever normality they can. we have gone to see what they live is like for them. >> a fight to win the game. in this part ok homs, children get a chance to forget the war. everyone is trying to make the best of breaks between the fighting. i grant is part of a newly built market set up -- this playground is part of a newly built market set up by the local area. dozens of shops were hastily put up. she'd tell me there is an urgent need. >> displaced people could not get to their places of work. they started selling goods on the pavement, so a neighbor suggested setting up shops on a neighboring piece of land. glaxo much of the city has been destroyed. people here are eager to tell their stories, but some do not want to appear on camera, fearing arrest by security forces if they speak their mind. this man tells me he used to have a well paying job, but now he is selling through to try and make a living. he says he wa
city. he is remembered with great respect and affection. the pope's message of working for the common good is something that spoke to the whole country. >> the cardinals recognize that this was a momentous decision for pope benedict. in two weeks' time, he will no longer be pope. another pope will be slected. >> when pope benedict took office in 2005, he was 78 years old. he was the oldest pontiff elected in three centuries. our religious correspondent has this report. >> benedict became the church's leader, already an elderly and frail man. he was seen as a caretaker, but nothing prepared roman catholics for his decision to step down. >> this has taken the world by surprise. >> catholics attending services were shocked by the news. >> you are joking. the pope? oh, my god. >> i'm so shocked. he has been such a short time with us. >> joseph was born into a catholic family in germany and was forced into the hitler youth. he was brought up as a theologian. he became more conservative in the 1960's. it was as a traditionalist that he became the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the peo
. >> the competition for the most vibrant, noisy, an overcrowded city on earth, mumbai would be right up there. the contrasts and contradictions are striking. >> wow. a is 30-years old, businessman. they are thinking of upgrading. he went out on a test drive. >> the back and the front of this car looks the way it does with the lights. aside when they see you. that is a fantastic feeling to just accelerate. >> not everyone is able to live in mumbai's fast lane. all cities have their divisions between rich and poor. rarely do you see it in such an extreme form as you do in mumbai. there is no running water and sewage runs down the alleyway. this is nothing like as bad as it gets. one person describes this as a middle-class slum. where do you wash? >> this woman showed me around her 1-room house. this room is about 3 meters by 3 meters. it is home to five people. who lives here? you live here and your children? and your husband? and your mother-in-law? how do you all fit? it is very small. it is a tighte squeeze. they have got mats on the floor. >> i want to know what jobs you want to do when you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 136 (some duplicates have been removed)